Teen Driving

It probably felt like you had all the time in the world to prepare, but the day has finally come when your teen is ready to start driving. Are you ready?

It can be a little nerve-wracking to start driving practice with your teenager, but it should also be exciting for both of you! Here are a few tips for parents of teen drivers to help make this learning process easier and more enjoyable for both you and your child.

Be an example

The best way to prepare your teen to be a safe driver even before they’re enrolled in drivers ed is to be an example of a safe driver. Don’t speed or drive recklessly, don’t use your cell phone while you’re driving, and avoid road rage at all costs.

Learn along with your child

Driver education has changed a lot over the years, which means your teen is learning techniques that may be completely different from what you learned when you were first driving. It’s important to familiarize yourself with the new techniques they’re learning so you can help them build safe driving habits that follow the newest rules and regulations.

The best way to understand what your child will learn in drivers ed and how they’ll be tested during their driving test is to read the most up-to-date version of the Motorist Handbook from the DMV. You can get a pdf copy from your local DMV website, or some libraries loan copies for free.

Use every moment in the car to teach

Even if you’re the one driving, explain what you’re doing or what techniques you’re using to ensure you’re being safe on the road and driving effectively. Have them ask you questions or talk through what they should be doing if they were behind the wheel.

Once your teen has their learners permit and can start practicing behind the wheel, you should set aside time every day to practice with them. Even if it’s only a short drive to the grocery store and back, every little bit of practice helps!

Choose the Appropriate Car

It’s important to consider a few variables to be sure your teen is comfortable and safe on the road.

Safety and dependability should be the main two priorities when deciding on a car for your teen driver. On average, teens are more likely to be involved in an accident than any other age group, so a vehicle with a great crash rating and additional crash avoidance technology is ideal.

Additionally, choosing a more reliable, less expensive vehicle is a better choice for a teen simply because they’re more likely to get into an accident or just drive the car a little harder. Generally, the best option is a car that has good gas mileage, low maintenance costs, and great safety features.

Check out this consumer reports list of some of the best cars for teens!

Prepare them for Different Weather Conditions

No matter where you live, there will always be days when the weather throws you a curveball and suddenly, you’re driving in unsafe conditions. It is absolutely vital to make sure your teen is prepared for different weather conditions so they know how to drive safely, and when they shouldn’t be driving at all.

While they’re still practicing for their license, take them out driving in different weather conditions so they can get a feel for it. For their first time driving in the rain, snow, or on slick roads, it’s best to take them to quieter streets or empty parking lots to practice first so they can drive without worrying about anyone else on the road.

Make sure to talk with them about what bad weather can look like and when they shouldn’t be driving at all. A good rule of thumb is if they don’t feel comfortable, don’t drive. If they are driving when the weather suddenly turns and they don’t feel safe driving, encourage them to pull over in a safe place and wait for it to subside.

Talk about the Risks

Teen drivers are more likely than any other age group to both engage in risky driving behavior and be injured or killed in a car accident. That is why it is so important to have conversations early and often about the risks of driving and how they can keep themselves and their passengers safe.

This doesn’t just mean stressing the dangers of impaired driving, but also discussing the risks of distracted driving, fatigued driving, and not wearing a seatbelt.

Set Some Ground Rules

Even before your child gets their license, it’s important to set some ground rules for when they’re driving as well as consequences for breaking the rules.

Here are a few of our suggested rules for your teen driver based on the highest risk behavior and regulations for probationary licenses. Feel free to use these or create your own!

  • NO CELL PHONES while driving
  • Always wear a seat belt
  • No Speeding
  • No drinking or using drugs and driving
  • Only one friend as a passenger at a time
  • No driving after midnight

Some insurance providers offer phone apps or tracking tools you can plug into your car that help monitor certain risky driving behaviors as well. Be sure to talk to your insurance when your teen starts driving to learn about what they have to offer.

Keep Up-to-Date on Maintenance

Finally, it is important to be sure you’re keeping up on your vehicle maintenance to keep your teen safe and your car running for as long as possible. If your teen gets their own car, teach them the importance of maintaining their vehicle and help them keep track of the regular maintenance needed.

Final Thoughts

Whether your teen is already driving or they’re almost ready to start drivers ed, it’s important to stress the importance of good safety habits while on the road. Encourage their learning process by learning along with them; setting aside time to practice driving, and talking about the risks of distracted driving.

Learning to drive should be fun and exciting for both of you, and it’s a great opportunity to build and maintain safe driving skills that will stick with your child for life. Drive safe!

Disclaimer: Use at Your Own Risk 

The information provided in all blog articles is for educational purposes only. Pass Drivers Ed is not a licensed automotive expert, and any information regarding automotive repairs or maintenance should not be taken as professional automotive advice. Pass Drivers Ed is not responsible for any damages or injuries resulting in following the information provided.

It probably felt like you had all the time in the world to prepare, but the day has finally come when your teen is ready to start driving. Are you ready?

It can be a little nerve-wracking to start driving practice with your teenager, but it should also be exciting for both of you! Here are a few tips for parents of teen drivers to help make this learning process easier and more enjoyable for both you and your child.

Be an example

The best way to prepare your teen to be a safe driver even before they’re enrolled in drivers ed is to be an example of a safe driver. Don’t speed or drive recklessly, don’t use your cell phone while you’re driving, and avoid road rage at all costs.

Learn along with your child

Driver education has changed a lot over the years, which means your teen is learning techniques that may be completely different from what you learned when you were first driving. It’s important to familiarize yourself with the new techniques they’re learning so you can help them build safe driving habits that follow the newest rules and regulations.

The best way to understand what your child will learn in drivers ed and how they’ll be tested during their driving test is to read the most up-to-date version of the Motorist Handbook from the DMV. You can get a pdf copy from your local DMV website, or some libraries loan copies for free.

Use every moment in the car to teach

Even if you’re the one driving, explain what you’re doing or what techniques you’re using to ensure you’re being safe on the road and driving effectively. Have them ask you questions or talk through what they should be doing if they were behind the wheel.

Once your teen has their learners permit and can start practicing behind the wheel, you should set aside time every day to practice with them. Even if it’s only a short drive to the grocery store and back, every little bit of practice helps!

Choose the Appropriate Car

It’s important to consider a few variables to be sure your teen is comfortable and safe on the road.

Safety and dependability should be the main two priorities when deciding on a car for your teen driver. On average, teens are more likely to be involved in an accident than any other age group, so a vehicle with a great crash rating and additional crash avoidance technology is ideal.

Additionally, choosing a more reliable, less expensive vehicle is a better choice for a teen simply because they’re more likely to get into an accident or just drive the car a little harder. Generally, the best option is a car that has good gas mileage, low maintenance costs, and great safety features.

Check out this consumer reports list of some of the best cars for teens!

Prepare them for Different Weather Conditions

No matter where you live, there will always be days when the weather throws you a curveball and suddenly, you’re driving in unsafe conditions. It is absolutely vital to make sure your teen is prepared for different weather conditions so they know how to drive safely, and when they shouldn’t be driving at all.

While they’re still practicing for their license, take them out driving in different weather conditions so they can get a feel for it. For their first time driving in the rain, snow, or on slick roads, it’s best to take them to quieter streets or empty parking lots to practice first so they can drive without worrying about anyone else on the road.

Make sure to talk with them about what bad weather can look like and when they shouldn’t be driving at all. A good rule of thumb is if they don’t feel comfortable, don’t drive. If they are driving when the weather suddenly turns and they don’t feel safe driving, encourage them to pull over in a safe place and wait for it to subside.

Talk about the Risks

Teen drivers are more likely than any other age group to both engage in risky driving behavior and be injured or killed in a car accident. That is why it is so important to have conversations early and often about the risks of driving and how they can keep themselves and their passengers safe.

This doesn’t just mean stressing the dangers of impaired driving, but also discussing the risks of distracted driving, fatigued driving, and not wearing a seatbelt.

Set Some Ground Rules

Even before your child gets their license, it’s important to set some ground rules for when they’re driving as well as consequences for breaking the rules.

Here are a few of our suggested rules for your teen driver based on the highest risk behavior and regulations for probationary licenses. Feel free to use these or create your own!

  • NO CELL PHONES while driving
  • Always wear a seat belt
  • No Speeding
  • No drinking or using drugs and driving
  • Only one friend as a passenger at a time
  • No driving after midnight

Some insurance providers offer phone apps or tracking tools you can plug into your car that help monitor certain risky driving behaviors as well. Be sure to talk to your insurance when your teen starts driving to learn about what they have to offer.

Keep Up-to-Date on Maintenance

Finally, it is important to be sure you’re keeping up on your vehicle maintenance to keep your teen safe and your car running for as long as possible. If your teen gets their own car, teach them the importance of maintaining their vehicle and help them keep track of the regular maintenance needed.

Final Thoughts

Whether your teen is already driving or they’re almost ready to start drivers ed, it’s important to stress the importance of good safety habits while on the road. Encourage their learning process by learning along with them; setting aside time to practice driving, and talking about the risks of distracted driving.

Learning to drive should be fun and exciting for both of you, and it’s a great opportunity to build and maintain safe driving skills that will stick with your child for life. Drive safe!

Disclaimer: Use at Your Own Risk 

The information provided in all blog articles is for educational purposes only. Pass Drivers Ed is not a licensed automotive expert, and any information regarding automotive repairs or maintenance should not be taken as professional automotive advice. Pass Drivers Ed is not responsible for any damages or injuries resulting in following the information provided.

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